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the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
cut down talks completely on jobs and wanting to cut the education credit. the president signed the "dream act," and hundreds of thousands of students are able to get their education. i am educated. i put my son through law school. it is his birthday today on columbus day, october 8. we moved to california when i was 8 years old. my mother remarried and my stepfather was a marine at camp pendleton and coronado. host: thank you for the call. guest: everything she said, i disagree with. she did talk about lowering the cost of education for kids getting into college. that is significant. she also talked about the blue part of the state that has really struggled. over the last 30 or 35 years. it's now starting to come back with a gas and oil industry, making sure that it is safe, with the steel industry, it's starting to come back. and certainly with the automotive industry. we have to be positive about those kind of things. if we continuously be rated president and start saying government is not working, voters react to that. jay and i know that go to washington or columbus, they d
in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action. the scene outside the supreme court building made clear just how anticipated this case has been. for the first time in nearly a decade, the justices are considering whether it's constitutional for universities to use race in deciding who they admit. the suit was brought by abigail fisher-- a white, honor ro
that the narrow focus on racial diversity in higher education has eclipsed larger issues of class and the quality, among colleges and universities. so, in advance of the u.s. supreme court's oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas, which will take place next week, the century foundation put together a report which i am going to outline which looks at the question, is it possible to create racial and ethnic diversity without using race, and instead paying attention to larger issues of economic equality in our society. it is called a better affirmative action. it makes three main points. the first, that racial affirmative action is likely on its way out. affirmative action based on race was always meant to be temporary by those who originally envisioned it, a deviation for a period of time away from the non-discrimination principle. but now there are both legal and political forces that appear to be bringing affirmative action to a end. to begin with, it is highly unpopular among average american voters. if you look at the supreme court briefs in the fisher case, you would think there i
the first question i went to princeton university i hope these guys are good to be well-educated and know something and the first question is where is your tomahawk? the borderland follows me everywhere. there was no way to escape it. the only way through it and so i realized there are not that -- i wouldn't be the barometer by which a lot of people what, you know, understand or judge native people so i realize the importance of my work and that her presentation. >> one of the things i like about your book is balance and that's important that type of community based upon balance but in the book we had a lot of balance, we balance the topics dealing with sensitive issues that might be sensitive to a non-native person like mike cherokee grandmother was a cherokee princess for the tribal community for enrollment and then you dealt with tough issues like the history of christopher columbus so there's a history lesson and then the ler enjoyment of reading the book. how did you decide what to include and what not to include in this book? >> guest: writing the book happened faster than my resear
school district are not reading at grade level. so that group is now suing the state and education leaders. our legal guys will have an opinion or two on this one. [ ryan ] it doesn't get any better than endless shrimp at red lobster. you can mix and match all day! [ male announcer ] don't miss red lobster's endless shrimp, just $14.99! try as much as you like, any way you like! like parmesan crusted shrimp. hurry in, offer ends soon! i'm ryan isabell and i see food differently. 100% new. 100% mmm... wow, that is mmm... it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calories. new yoplait greek 100. it is so good. new yoplait greek 100. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ playing a lone hand ♪ my life begins today ♪ ♪ fly by night
and people for its neighborhood canvas program. >>> town hall meeting will be held to discuss education and its future in california. the gathering will be held with education officials. they hope community members will bring their concerns and ideas to that forum. >>> the program starts this morning at 9:00 a.m. community members can show up at 8:30 to sign it. it will be held at the san mateo city hall. >>> oakland student, teachers and families will rally in front of a local high school. they are concerned about the cuts to public education and services to children and families. they hope sharing personal stories will urge people to support prop 30. >>> right now, david blain is standing on a 20-foot platform surrounded by millions of volts of electricity. have crazy. he started at 4:30 yesterday in manhattan. he is wearing a 20-pound chain suit. he plans to remain on that platform without food for 72 hours. >> this is beyond impressive. and it is amazing. it is sort of like the harry howdini story. >> so blain's doctor says the main risk, exposure to by-products of that electric fin
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> 5% of those currently serving in the u.s. congress are latino. despite the u.s. population. 2.5% in congress are asian or pacific islander. even though they make up 5% of the nation's population. those disparities could all change come november 6th. a report to be issued tomorrow at a new american leaders project examines how demographics and redistricting have created a record number of opportunities for immigrant communities to gain political office. this chart shows the breakdown of first and second generation candidates running for congress by their ethnicity. now, note that almost 70% of candidates represented here are latino with polls showing the majority of them expected to win their races. asian americans could see changes too. for example, new york state could be poised for its first asian american to congress. that person with me now. assembly woman grace payne is running in the new york's 6th congressional di
about his policies on taxes, education and healthcare. today the candidates foreign policy positions went under the knife during a speech at the virginia military institute. romney laid out a complete reversal on his strategy for mideast peace. >> i recommit america to the goal of democratic prosperous palestinian state living side by side in peace and security with the jewish state of israel. >> the new mitt romney is totally committed to a two-state solution in israel but this is not what mitt romney told a group of wealthy donors in private. >> and i look at the palestinians not wanting to see peace anyway, for political purposes -- of iz real and these thorny issues, and i say there's just no way going to remain an unsolved problem we live with that in china and taiwan. all right, we have a potentially volatile situation but we sort of live with it, and we kick the ball down the field and hope that ultimately, somehow, something will happen and resolve it. >> priceless tape, isn't it? direct from romney's mouth. you hope from is some stability. you hope something will happen. lis
? >> there are few opportunities in freeport but tom is in a unique system. his age and education goes against him, but his passion and legacy of hard work are attributed to him, and there could be opportunities for tom and the rest of the workers. the workers aren't slouches. they don't work on widgets, they work on high-tolerance machinery, they are educated and globally competitive, and they have shown that in the marketplace where there is about a 40% margin on these products already. so you have great people like tom who have some things going against him, but his passion, hard work, and love for the community are one thing that will hopefully help him get through. >> jennifer: mayor the human costs of all of this outsourcing cannot be overstated. i really appreciate you coming on to explain. just a quick postscript by the way to this story. also want to let you know about another company that bain capital owns and that's asimco. bane purchased that company in michigan about five years ago. and in 2007, the michigan facility was shut down and the jobs were moved to guess
for scientific research and education, hall said this about scientists who come before his committee to talk about the reality of climate change. quote, i think we ought to listen to them. i just don't think we ought to mind them. that's a theirer. their colleague jim sensenbrenner has called the idea of climate change an international conspiracy and science tisk fascism. heard enough? don't forget about todd akin. he has a slot on the science committee, he and his theory that in legitimate cases of rape the woman can't get pregnant. >>> up next, republicans probably figured they had the senate seat in ads all wrapped up, but richard carmona has come out of nowhere and coming on strong. now we have a race out there. richard carmona joins us next. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers
and regards to tax policy. because an educated person, they know that the mass does not add up. host: thank you. this story from the washington post. plan would do little to lower tax rates. -- wilmington, delaware. dave on our line for democrats. caller: thank you for taking my call. a want to make two comments. first of all, in the last vice presidential debate, the moderator seem to have more control from the fact that the men were sitting at a table. and that close proximity to -- i gather that the attention to the moderator was better, versus the first debate were there was a distance between the speakers. and jim lehrer had much more trouble trying to control the debate. the second thing come on the first debate jim lehrer was asking each of the candidates to speak about the differences that they feel that they have with the other candidate. and sort of a different type of question, much more interruption. host: what you think of the choice of the four moderators? bobb and mandy coming up? >> fantastic. and i look forward to the town hall format. which gets more of the town hall and a
. the headline is that racial preferences and higher education definitely came under attack today. >> let's remind everyone, ten years ago, the u.s. supreme court upheld affirmative action, less than, 2003, what has changed since then? >> this case is factually similar to the university of michigan case nine years ago. what has changed is the court, justice sandra day o'connor wrote the majority opinion nine years ago upholding diversity as a compelling interest. o'connor is no longer on the court. today the person to watch is the justice anthony kennedy, not against the idea, but hasn't found the affirmative action program that is narrowly tailored enough for him to like it. >> what about the fact that justice elana kagan, she recused herself here, there could be a tie they could decide four justices one way, four another. what happens in that case? >> in that case, the previous precedent stands. so the university of michigan case from nine years ago would continue to be the law of the land if they ended up in a 4-4 tie. >> all right, joe johns, thank you very much. u.s. supreme court to
of the expenditures in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986 even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the ot
people in the audience. they like it. we viewed it as part of the educational function of the commission of presidential debates. that is what we do it on college campuses. it is amazing, there are thousands of students out there on one side or the other. they are energized. the people in this community are energized. we think is very important to have this sort of setting and we will continue this. there is much jargon about whether or not it ought to be in a studio. -- much argument about whether it ought to be in a studio. i think that is a sterile environment. the university campuses the center of learning in our country. >> we are about to begin engaging our audience on the importance of the vice- presidential debate. our question to them is, does it affect your vote? >> it is a trite expression, but it is true, that the vice president is one heartbeat from the presidency. over the last 50 years, we have had places where the vice president has had to become the president. sometimes temporarily, when we have had operations on some of the existing precedents. other times there are ass
, fish hatcheries. i could go on all day. it is transforming america's approach to energy, education, health care, transportation and more. it is one of the most important and least understood pieces of legislation in modern american history. the short term recovery part as well as the long term investment part. it is also the purist distillation of what obama meant by change. it is a major down payment on all of his biggest campaign promises. the story of the stimulus not only fun and gripping story but it is a microcosm of the obama era. the best way to understand the president, his policies, his approach to politics, his achievements and his troubled marketing this achievement in a city that has gone bonkers. also the best way to understand his enemies. this book documents the republican plot to destroy obama before he even took office. you always heard about it and imagine it must be there but i got these guys to tell me about it. these secret meetings where eric cantor and mitch mcconnell plan their paths to power. before i open this up to what you want to talk about i want to t
improvements in public education, safety, welfare reform, and i described how worked with leaders in the other party to get results for the people. the bad economy, his decision, his choice serving as national party chairman rather than focusing on the economic crisis in virginia. it is the great, and answer a question in this campaign. how does a governor decide to take on a second job, giving partisan speeches, well over 100,000 jobs are lost here in virginia. if he had given his governorship the full attention, he might have avoided some mistakes like increase in college tuition by over 40%. if he had been listening to the people of virginia who are really facing tough times, he might not have proposed raising taxes on working people, working women, seniors, small business owners, and people earning $17,000. he might tip been against the sequestration deal threatening jobs in virginia right now. but he made different choices. soon, you'll get to choose. if i have the honor of being your senator, i will give all my energy to working with both parties and getting america us sending once again
of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. swhooiter is. >>> young voters could be the key to a victory for president obama. annette taddeo joins me to discuss the youth vote and enthusiasm leading up to this election. >>> paul ryan e gets honest on gun laws while the national rifle association continues to spread lies about the president's policies. we'll have all the details. >>> and as the polls shift after last week's debate, will we get fooled again by mitt romney's lies? we'll look at what a romney presidency would mean for americans. share your thoughts with us on facebook and twitter using @edshow. we're coming right back. [ male announcer ] wouldn't it be cool if we took the nissan altima and reimagined nearly everything in it? gave it greater horsepower and best in class 38 mpg highway... advanced headlights... and zero gravity seats? yeah, that would be cool. ♪ introducing the completely reimagined nissan altima. it's our most innov
take race into account in fashioning their student bodies to make sure there is educational diversity. >> what is the university of system for acceptance? guest: bic most kids from the top 10 system, the top 10 percentage of schools in texas. then it is about 75% of the class. the of a 25% is admitted on the way that most universities admit, the look of the entire file, academic credentials, but all other factors, life experiences, rick and assist the city -- race and ethnicity. the last part is what abigail objects to. there is no role for the government to be sort of people by race. >> the university of texas of austin's has what? guest: they say the supreme court has endorsed education and diversity as a compelling goal for the government and an exception to the usual rule that the government should not be classified people by race. it is true, and a 5-4 decision, the supreme court said that, but the key vote, sandra day o'connor, has retired, replaced by a more conservative judge, samuel alito, so in that they give us a new result. >> what is the result of this, who will hear it,
security and medicare and medicaid and education and so forth come from the ground up. they're what people want, they're what people need, they're what people voted for. they're part of the fabric of american life. they're not trickle-down anything. and what the president has to do and what joe biden has to do tomorrow night is to confront that notion. joe biden has to not only defend the president and attack paul ryan for his libertarian ideas, joe biden has to defend social security and medicare and the very idea of the usefulness and the importance of government in sharing responsibility in america, a big, heavy lift for joe biden tomorrow night. >> it's a heavy lift, howard, i agree, but it's also right in his wheelhouse. everyone in this country knows his middle class background. he is true to his value of helping the middle class. he legislated that way for 30 years in the senate. some think that joe biden's been put in an untenable position, a tough position. but isn't this good for biden? and i think for the president to come out and say joe's got to be joe, that's kind of saying,
's just educating them. funny, the koch brothers, they say the same thing. darrell and charles koch sent a list of suggested candidates to 500,000 employees during the last election. monday, they launched a $1 million ad campaign in 13 states. they say they're just educating voters. all of these millionaire and billionaire bosses are supporting romney for several reasons. romney will cut their taxes and deregulate their industries. it's not about the workers, it's about using the workers to deliver greater wealth to these bosses. let's turn to robert reich, former secretary of labor under bill clinton and now a professor at public policy at uc berkeley and author of the book, "beyond outrage." this would take many employees, i think, to outrage, knowing that their job could be on the line if they don't vote the way the boss wants them to. mr. reich, good to have you with us tonight. do these ceos care more about their employees or their bottom line? >> ed, there's no question. they care not only about their bottom lines, but they treat their employees as costs to be cut rather than asset
childhood education... slash k-12 funding... and cut college aid for middle class families ... they won't go far. yet t that's exactly what mitt romney wants to do... ...to pay for a $250,000 tax break for multi-millionaires. if mitt romney wins, the middle class loses. priorities usa action is responsible for the content of this advertising. of >> between lotus sports desk. brought to you by your local -- >> the toyota sports desk. brought to you by your local toyota dealers. >> let's recap how it happened. 2nd quarter -- makes an amazing play. goes 28 yards. gets some speed, goes into the crowd. possible momentum change here. billy cundiff -- will he have a job tomorrow? they could be up 10-0, but no. tying the game at 7. holding it's breath on this play. trying to get the first down -- and boom. he lands a huge hit. take another look. he was down for quite a while. it was careful afterwards. they say he has a mild concussion, according to mike shanahan. falcons taking a 14-10 lead. he throws to santana moss going for a 77-yard touchdown. tied at 17. late in the 4th hand off up
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986. even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the other side who n
political differences we were very close friends. >> reporter: davis sees his role as an educator, teaching members of congress about his clients' issues. >> the most important function a lobbyist provides is to provide facts and information. >> reporter: but first they have to get their foot in the door. >> hi, congressman, how are you? reporter: the business of lobbying is shrouded in secrecy. >> great to meet you. reporter: we were given rare access to the inner workings. including this networking event for lobbyists and their guests. >> i really specialize in technology and helping those small technology companies through the process. >> you find that champion for your cause and you ride that for all its worth. >> reporter: our cameras were allowed along on actual lobby visits, being conducted most any time congress is in session. davis is such a familiar face in the halls of the capitol, republican congresswoman mary bono mack greets him with a kiss. >> lobbyists trade on -- if you want to use the bad word -- trade on friendships. >> excuse me. this is a won woman. >> do i ever ask a f
shoots a teenager who wanted gilrls education and peace. ahn date straight ahead. by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ >>> welcome back to "early start." i'm zoraida sambolin. >> i'm john berman. this morning anger in the streets of pakistan in newspapers and on the air waves over the taliban's targeting shooting of 14-year-old malala you saf is a. surgeons worked for three hours to remo
of education came up last week several times in the debate. i know this is an issue as a state legislature that you have worked a lot on. >> it is the arizona state legislature sadly is known for being the state that has cut education the most the deeper per capita over the last several years, so arizona schools are struggling, and i teach at arizona state university -- >> bill: oh, wow. >> i have been teaching there for ten years now. before they was a social worker at an elementary school. so this is a really important issue for me. my own story, i think informs why it is important to me. i was homeless when i was a kid, and it was through public education, pell grants academic scholarships that i was able to make it to the middle class and in arizona we're struggling to keep that high-quality education system, and this is a top issue in our race. my opponent wants to eliminate the department of education which would get rid of pell grants. it would eliminate after ford loans, work study program withes, and cut close to a billion dollars of funding from arizona sch
. in fact, by thinking about where you want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. [ man ] when i'm in my zone... every move i make is a statement... ♪ ...that inspires me to make my mark. ♪ [ male announcer ] the all-new lexus es 350. ♪ try this... bayer? this isn't just a headache. trust me, this is new bayer migraine. [ male announcer ] it's the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. >>> now on display at the pro football hall of fame in canton, ohio. he broke johnny unitas' record. he joins us from new orleans where we should mention he is also the spokesman for paid 60 and also kinect from x-box. how do you feel about it? >> tremendous honor, very humbling. historic night. so many people are part of that. and just glad that it's over with. >> really? >> obviously the pressure mounting, going into the game. you just want to focus on doing your job and, you know, executing each play and winning the game
. >> students have are having a hard time paying for school so voting is important for education purposes. >> i don't think cutting taxes or protecting the wealthy is the way to go. >> i was lucky enough to find a job at the beginning of the summer, but it's really difficult to find a job when you're a college student. >> interesting. those students were in line to get tickets for president obama's speech later this week at the university of miami. in 2008, senator obama beat senator john mccain by 2 to 1 in the margin in the youth vote in this country. it's crucial for the president to get similar numbers this time around if he's going to win the state of florida. of course, to vote they must be registered and voter registration drives have been underway for months. according to statistics from the florida secretary of state, democrats have 500,000 more registered voters than republicans. now, there are 2.8 million people registered as independents or with a third party. the numbers are interesting, but it means nothing if there's no emotional component that will motivate them to do it. this i
an education and she's 14 years old shot in the head by the taliban and trying to silence women and young girls and she deserves the peace prize and i will see this, the euro-weenies who give out the nobel peace prize to the eu, it's not as appalling as when they gave it to yasser arafat and barack obama after being president for-- >> can i say this about that, eu getting the nobel peace prize is like praising your drug addicted kid for showing up for school every day, it's beside the point. the eu is about to go into a huge depression, everything is going i don't think, not right, they don't deserve a nobel peace prize. stuart: why did they give it to them. what's the motivation? i don't get it. >> if i could explain it i would. you went through the track record who they've given the prize to in the past. stuart: i want to go back to the 14-year-old pakistani girl. if anybody deserved it, that brave young woman. and do you know that the taliban have been dumping bodies around her parents' house as a warning to that girl. stop what you're doing. stop supporting education for females, dumping bo
. it helps the educational experience. what's your-- >> diversity has become the new excuse for racial preference of. it used to be to make up for past wrongdoings for blacks, that was the justification for it. we've switched to diversity which could go on forever. the right racial mix, it's the ultimate justifications for racial preferences. the problem is there's no evidence that's the case. there's no evidence a black kid needs to be sitting next to a white kid to read shakespeare and understand what's going on or calculus, a ridiculous argument and oneway street. only blacks can bring diversity to white kids. you don't see people complaining not enough white kids at howard university, all black school. >> in this case, the swing vote. in the michigan case justice kennedy said he had qualms will justin o'connor's decision that this was a step on the road to racial neutrality. >> she said 25 years and it would kind of phase out. >> and kennedy had his daughters they'd want to use race as a basis. i agree with justice kennedy about the university of michigan and i think that's going o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 164 (some duplicates have been removed)